Volvo P1800S 1966

Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction

Volvo P1800S 1966 sold for £9,805 at our April 25th Classic Car Auction

Lot 23

Made famous by Roger Moore who, as Simon Templar, drove one in the popular TV ‘The Saint’ series during the sixties. Roger was so smitten with the Volvo that he bought one for his own personal use. Built in Sweden this car has an 1800cc engine and 4 speed with overdrive. First registered on 17th June 1966, this left hand drive example of the Volvo P1800S originated in the Netherlands bearing number DM-20-12. It then moved to Ireland in 2006 . An older restoration that has just been recommissioned, it presents very well. Just had new battery, tyres and shocks fitted as well as a comprehensive service. Comes with original handbook (in Dutch naturally!) a detailed description of extensive works carried out in 1994 as well receipts for servicing from 2006 to date. Will come with NOVA certification for UK registration.

Condition: 2

Estimated sale price: £9,000 – £11,000

Sold for £9,805.

Additional information on the Volvo P1800S

“The project was started in 1957 because Volvo wanted a sports car, despite the fact that their previous attempt, the P1900, had been a disaster, with only 68 cars sold. The man behind the project was an engineering consultant to Volvo,Helmer Petterson, who in the 1940s was responsible for the Volvo PV444. The design work was done by Helmer’s son Pelle Petterson, who worked at Pietro Frua at that time. Volvo insisted it was an Italian design by Frua and only officially recognized that Pelle Petterson designed it in 2009. The Italian Carrozzeria Pietro Frua design firm (then a recently acquired subsidiary of Ghia) built the first three prototypes between September 1957 and early 1958, later designated by Volvo in September 1958: P958-X1, P958-X2 and P958-X3 (P:Project 9:September 58:Year 1958 = P958).

“In December 1957 Helmer Petterson drove X1, (the first hand-built P1800 prototype) to OsnabrückWest Germany, headquarters of Karmann. Petterson hoped that Karmann would be able to take on the tooling and building of the P1800. Karmann’s engineers had already been preparing working drawings from the wooden styling buck at Frua. Petterson and Volvo chief engineer Thor Berthelius met there, tested the car and discussed the construction with Karmann. They were ready to build it and this meant that the first cars could hit the market as early as December 1958. But in February, Karmann’s most important customer, Volkswagen VAG, forbade Karmann to take on the job. They feared that the P1800 would compete with the sales of their own cars, and threatened to cancel all their contracts with Karmann if they took on this car. This setback almost caused the project to be abandoned.

“Other German firms, NSU, Drautz and Hanomag, were contacted but none was chosen because Volvo did not believe they met Volvo’s manufacturing quality-control standards.

“It began to appear that Volvo might never produce the P1800. This motivated Helmer Petterson to obtain financial backing from two financial firms with the intention of buying the components directly from Volvo and marketing the car himself. At this point Volvo had made no mention of the P1800 and the factory would not comment. Then a press release surfaced with a photo of the car, putting Volvo in a position where they had to acknowledge its existence. These events influenced the company to renew its efforts: the car was presented to the public for the first time at the Brussels Motor Show in January 1960 and Volvo turned to Jensen Motors, whose production lines were under-utilised, and they agreed a contract for 10,000 cars. The Linwood, Scotland, body plant of manufacturer Pressed Steel was in turn sub-contracted by Jensen to create the unibody shells, which were then taken by rail to be assembled at Jensen in West Bromwich, England. In September 1960, the first production P1800 (for the 1961 model year) left Jensen for an eager public.

“As time progressed, Jensen had problems with quality control, so the contract was ended early at 6,000 cars. In 1963 production was moved to Volvo’s Lundby Plant in Gothenburg and the car’s name was changed to 1800S (S standing for Sverige, or in English : Sweden). The engine was improved with an additional 8 hp (6 kW). In 1966 the four-cylinder engine was updated to 115 hp (86 kW). Top speed was 175 km/h (109 mph). In 1969 the B18 engine was replaced with the 2-litre B20B variant of the B20 giving 118 bhp (89 kW), though it kept the designation 1800S.”

Source: wikipedia.org

Click on each image for larger version.

Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction Volvo p1800s entered into april 25th classic car auction